The Intermittent Volunteer’s Weblog

Befriending People in Dallas Who Are Homeless

Race, Opioid Addiction, & Crack Cocaine March 30, 2016

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

 

Race, Opioid Addiction, & Crack Cocaine

A brief essay on how race may impact our approach to drug addiction.  Worth watching and considering…

 

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/there-was-no-wave-of-compassion-when-addicts-were-hooked-on-crack/

 

“Give Me a Shot of Anything” April 6, 2015

Monday, April 6, 2015

“Give Me a Shot of Anything:  House Calls to the Homeless”

I find these video clips to be riveting.  What do you think?

Night Time House Calls

http://www.givemeashotofanything.com/#!videos/vstc6=night-time-house-calls

Trailer

http://www.givemeashotofanything.com/#!videos/vstc6=extended-teaser

The Film Maker

http://www.givemeashotofanything.com/#!videos/vstc6=newfilmmakers

The Website

http://www.givemeashotofanything.com/#!

Boston Health Care for the Homeless

http://www.bhchp.org

 

The Video: Death on Skid Row March 3, 2015

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

 

The Video:  Death on Skid Row

I have just watched the video of a homeless, mentally ill man being shot to death by Los Angeles police.  Regardless of what the investigation about this death reveals as to cause and fault, this is one of the saddest, most terrifying pieces of film I’ve ever seen.  People, we gotta’ change some things.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/02/lapd-shooting-cops-gun_n_6787310.html

 

You Can’t… August 26, 2013

Monday, August 26, 2013

 

Wise Words From Someone Who Knows…

“You can’t preach [the Gospel] to someone who is starving.

You can’t entertain people who are dying.”

~~  Pastor Karen Dudley, Founder and Senior Pastor, Dallas International Street Church

 

A Message From Karen Dudley & The Dallas International Street Church August 15, 2012

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

 

Personal Message 

from 

Pastor Karen   

 “Where there is no vision the people perish”

Proverbs 29:18

In talking with more and more youth there seems to be a lack of vision for their generation.  Many are meandering through life without purpose or goals.  With this mindset it should come as no suprise that many find themselves in bondage to drugs, alcohol, cutting and abusive relationships.  In other words they are perishing. And adults are no better in that they suffer from the same emptiness.  No vision.  Thats where the church stands in and and cast the vision of God before His people in order that they may get a vision for themselves, their marriage, their family, etc. If we want to stop the perishing in our communities then we the church must begin to cast the vision of God but before we can do that we must first have a vision of God ourselves.

 

 

 

Man Walking May 30, 2012

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Man Walking

Today I was driving to lunch with one of my daughters when we saw an elderly man walking along a road in East Dallas carrying a plastic trash bag full of what I assumed were his possessions.  He looked very much in need of a good meal, so we turned the car around and went back to find him, pulling over at a cross street as he came to the corner.

 

“Hi,” I said, “Do you need some money?”  My daughter looked at me quizzically and asked quietly, “Would anyone ever say ‘no’ to that question?”  But in fact, street people often do refuse help if they don’t need it, and the question genuinely reflected the information I was seeking.  “Yes, I do,” he replied, “I could use some food.”

 

My daughter opened my billfold and handed me some cash. The man certainly wasn’t begging near an ATM or gas station — in fact he wasn’t begging period — so no panhandling laws were being broken, not that it would concern me much if they were.

 

“I’m Karen,” I said, “What’s your name?”  It was a simple name, the same as that of a famous R&B singer.  “So how’s it going?” I asked him as I handed him the money, leaning out my car window.

 

“Well, I recently got hit by a car, and it smashed my hip.  I was in the hospital, right next to a woman who had been burned over 50% of her body.  Here she was, in such bad shape, but she was happy!  She was going through so much [he described her injuries], and I had only my hip to worry about, but I was so sad about my condition.  Yet here she was, like I said, happy.  I just couldn’t get over it.”

 

Now this man, mind you, was quite thin and weathered and appeared to have very little in the way of possessions.  His eyes were cloudy from what I’m guessing were cataracts.  His walking was slow and labored.

 

He continued.  “So, seeing the way she was, [in such bad shape], but happy, I made up my mind.  I said to myself, ‘My hip is well — it’s not going to bother me any more.’  And I left the hospital.”

 

And he, in turn, was happy, inspired by the lady in the next bed.  He had decided that it was so.

 

People are just remarkable, aren’t they?

 

KS

 

Coercion or Cooperation? January 10, 2012

Monday, January 9, 2012

Coercion or Cooperation?

Pine Street Inn in Boston, Massachusetts, New England’s largest resource for homeless men and women, sends Outreach vans onto the city’s streets 365 nights per year — in the cold, snow and rain — offering homeless men and women help in the form of warm blankets, hot meals, clean clothes and transportation to shelter.  The journal below allows us to follow a van on one night’s journey and details some of the experiences of the shelter’s outreach volunteers.

Imagine just for a moment that you are one of the homeless women or men described in the article.  As you read, ask yourself whether you would respond better to the approach used by Pine Street — one of respect and trust building — or to the methods used by many other cities, which often includes this choice:  “Do you want to go to a shelter or go to jail?”  KS

 

 

One Night’s Journey

December 2011

Have you ever wondered what happens to Boston’s homeless men and women on cold winter nights?



Every night, Pine Street Inn’s Outreach vans head out, loaded with warm blankets, hot meals and clean clothes, offering rides to shelter. Through the cold and snow, the Outreach teams crisscross the city from 9:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m., serving people in need.

Here are just a few of the situations that Outreach counselors Nelson, Vincent and Maggie encounter during one night on the vans.

10:05 p.m., Financial District

Outreach counselors find two homeless women in their 60s, Susan and Annie, huddled together in an alley. Susan was assaulted the previous night, and Annie is determined to stay by her side “to protect her.” Maggie offers the women hot soup and a sandwich. She listens as they tell their story, but senses that it will take time to build their trust before they will accept a ride to the shelter. Reluctantly, the Outreach team moves on, but they will check on Susan and Annie again tomorrow.

1:30 a.m., Washington Crossing

Outside a coffee shop, the Outreach team finds Donald, whom they have encouraged to go to shelter before. Tonight, he accepts a ride to Pine Street. On the way, Donald tells the counselors that he has been sick. By the time the van arrives at Pine Street, Vincent has arranged for Donald to see a doctor the next morning.

3:45 a.m., Boston Common

It’s cold and raining when Nelson spots a light coming from under a bridge. There, Nelson finds James, who is trying to stay dry. Nelson has known James for three months and is slowly trying to build his trust and convince him to spend the night at Pine Street. James has not been ready in the past, but tonight when Nelson asks if he’d like a ride to the shelter, James says “yes.”

A warm bed and a hot meal were his first steps on the road to a better life. Today – with the help of Pine Street – James has a full-time job and is living in his own apartment.

5:00 a.m., Pine Street Inn

The outreach vans return to Pine Street and the counselors meet to talk about the individuals they spoke with the night before and prepare for the next night’s journey.

Video link: “Human Dignity is Paramount:

http://www.pinestreetinn.org/about_history.php

http://www.pinestreetinn.org/